We’re more than half-way through the school year. Do you know what your PreK-4 student is doing next school year? For many, they are probably heading to Kindergarten… but what if you’re not sure your child is ready? Or if they have a birth date that’s after the traditional Kindergarten cut-off date?

You may want to consider a ‘transitional’ year.

Goldsmith Early Learning Center | Photos by Jen Snyder, (cool) progeny Goldsmith Early Learning Center | Photos by Jen Snyder, (cool) progeny

Goldsmith Early Childhood Center’s unique “Transitional Kindergarten” program, better known as K5, helps families “fill in the gap.” This sought-out program is designed for older four-year-olds and younger five-year-olds whose birthday may fall in the late summer to early fall. It is an ideal class for students who have completed a four-year-old curriculum, yet are too young to begin traditional kindergarten. K5 is a Transitional Kindergarten for students whose birth date is after the cut-off in most public and private schools.

“Children are natural learners. Curious, unafraid, and tactile. So we nurture that!” said director Michelle Gold.

What happens after the K5 year? Most students move on to kindergarten, while some go to pre-first or directly to first grade. It simply depends on what challenges your child is ready to take on next.

Using developmentally appropriate practices in a safe and nurturing environment, the K5 program combines a challenging state-approved Kindergarten curriculum with a creative, active approach to learning. Each day is structured to support the independence and success of early learners with a hands-on, exploratory approach. Each day’s “Activity Time” offers a variety of learning explorations, both required and optional, with the flexibility to work each station in an individualized routine.

Goldsmith Early Learning Center | Photos by Jen Snyder, (cool) progeny Goldsmith Early Learning Center | Photos by Jen Snyder, (cool) progeny

“Some children prefer to complete required activities at the start of Activity Time while others choose to mix required tasks with free choice play,” said Mrs. Gold.

In addition, children are exposed to basic Hebrew, knowledge of Jewish holidays, and ritual practices.

By providing familiar and structured framework, students have the confidence to achieve goals independently, stretch their horizons confidently, and work together cooperatively. The program’s social/emotional approach gives children the tools and vocabulary needed to resolve conflicts, understand and express their feelings, and have their needs and interests met in increasingly challenging social settings.

Goldsmith Early Learning Center | Photos by Jen Snyder, (cool) progeny Goldsmith Early Learning Center | Photos by Jen Snyder, (cool) progeny

“We use developmental practices with the intention to support your child’s discovery of who they are as a person, as a growing child, and as a learner. The skills we foster are designed to cultivate our students’ intellect and to help them find their path for a lifetime of learning,” said Mrs. Gold.

Curious about K5? Contact Michelle Gold, Director, Goldsmith Early Childhood Center at 410-486-8642 for a tour and see if the program is a good fit for your family!

Editor’s Note: This article is part of our Preschool Spotlight Series. This series aims to spotlight our partner preschools to give you a glimpse into what learning looks like on their campus. To learn more about Goldsmith Early Childhood Center, visit their directory listing in our Preschool Directory. Want to become a school partner? Email us. Photos by (cool) progeny photographer, Jen Snyder.